ALTERNATIVE TEXTBOOK GRANTS FOR INSTRUCTORS AIM TO REDUCE FINANCIAL BURDEN ON STUDENTS

FSU Libraries are currently taking applications for new Alternative Textbook Grants. These grants support FSU instructors in replacing commercial textbooks with open alternatives that are available to students at no cost. Open textbooks are written by experts and peer-reviewed, just like commercial textbooks, but are published under open copyright licenses so that they can be downloaded, distributed, and adapted for free.

“These grants encourage faculty to relieve some of the financial burden on their students, advancing the University’s strategic goal of ensuring an affordable education for all students regardless of socioeconomic status,” said Gale Etschmaier, Dean of University Libraries. “Grant programs of this kind are having a big impact at elite institutions across the country, collectively saving students millions in textbook costs each year.”

The cost of college textbooks has risen 300% since 1978, with a 90% cost increase over the last decade alone. Due to high costs, many students decide not to purchase textbooks, a decision which is proven to negatively impact student success. In a recent survey conducted by the Libraries, 72% of FSU students (n = 350) reported having not purchased a required textbook due to high cost. Instructors who participated in previous rounds of the Alternative Textbook Grants program are expected to save FSU students up to $270,000 by Summer 2019.

During the 2018-19 academic year, ten grants of $1,000 each will be available to FSU instructors who are interested in replacing commercial course materials with open textbooks, library-licensed electronic books or journal articles, or other zero-cost educational resources. Thanks to a partnership with International Programs, an additional ten grants of $1000 will be available for faculty who teach at FSU’s international study centers.

Interested instructors are encouraged to review the grant requirements and submit an online application form by the following dates:

  • October 1st, 2018 (for spring and summer on-campus courses)
  • November 1st, 2018 (for courses taught at our international study centers)
  • February 1st, 2019 (for summer and fall courses)

Successful applicants will receive training and consultations to assist them in implementing their alternative textbook. For more information, and to apply for a grant, please visit lib.fsu.edu/alttextbooks or contact Devin Soper, Scholarly Communications Librarian at dsoper@fsu.edu.

Florida State University Libraries’ mission is to drive academic excellence and success by fostering engagement through extensive collections, dynamic information resources, transformative collaborations, innovative services and supportive environments for FSU and the broader scholarly community.

THE FAMU-FSU COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING IS IMPROVING OUTREACH EFFORTS

FSU Libraries provides research, citation management, and public access support to students at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering. This joint program is located on a campus between Florida State University and Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida. FAMU-FSU College of Engineering offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) program in chemical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial and mechanical engineering, as well as M.S. and Ph.D. programs. Over the past 20 years, the College has awarded more than 5,000 degrees.

This year, FSU College of Engineering Librarians Renaine Julian and Denise A. Wetzel are working to increase outreach and services for students, staff, and faculty. Through the production of targeted postcards for faculty, to a brown bag workshop series, to the overhauling of the College of Engineering Library webpage, Fall 2018 is the semester of big changes.

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This Fall, College of Engineering Librarians are providing a series of brown bag workshops geared toward engineering researchers. These workshops will take place in Room B-202 at the College of Engineering. “Library Research 101 for Engineers” is set to be presented on Thursday, September 27thand Friday, September 28th. “Advanced Library Research for Engineers” will follow on Tuesday, October 9thand Friday, October 12th. To find out more information and to register, please click on any of the dates above. We request that all attendees bring a laptop to these sessions.

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The new FAMU-FSU College of Engineering Library webpage is now available. It can be found at: https://www.eng.famu.fsu.edu/library/. This page is simple to use, lists the library hours, includes links to get research started, and has the contact information for your College of Engineering personnel. Please take a look at this new site and bookmark it to easily find College of Engineering Library help.

If you have any questions or suggestions about FAMU-FSU College of Engineering Outreach, please contact Denise A. Wetzel at dwetzel@fsu.eduor (850) 644-3079.

Written By: Denise A. Wetzel

Open Textbook Network Workshop for FSU Faculty

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The Office of the Provost is sponsoring an open textbook workshop for FSU faculty from 10:00am-12:00pm on Thursday, October 25th. The workshop will be facilitated by two Open Textbook Network trainers, Dr. Abbey Dvorak and Josh Bolick from the University of Kansas. The purpose of the workshop is to introduce faculty to open textbooks and the benefits they can bring to student learning, faculty pedagogical practice, and social justice on campus.

Participating faculty will be invited to engage with an open textbook in their discipline by writing a brief review, for which they will be eligible to receive a $200 stipend.

What: Open Textbook Network Workshop

Where: Bradley Reading Room, Strozier Library

When: Thursday, October 25th, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Interested faculty members are invited to apply by Friday, October 12th. Capacity is limited and open textbooks are not available for all subjects. Preference will be based on the availability of open textbooks in applicable subject areas.

If you have questions about this workshop or open textbooks, please contact Devin Soper, Scholarly Communications Librarian, at 850-645-2600 or dsoper@fsu.edu. You can also visit the Open & Affordable Textbook Initiative website for more information about our open education initiatives.

FSU Libraries Year of Poetry: A community event you won’t want to miss.

The Southeast Review is excited to kick off the new school year with our confessions-themed open mic fundraiser + Issue 36.2 launch, hosted by the one and only David Kirby! Join us on Tuesday, September 4th at The Bark (507 All Saints St). Doors open at 7 pm. Read your most embarrassing elementary / middle school / high school / undergrad diary entries, sing a song, read a poem, perform a dramatic monologue—the stage is all yours. After all, what’s more literary or poetic than a confession?

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We will also have a photobooth (created by Art Editor, Kelly Butler; pictures taken by Kenny Johnson), a baked goods table (organized by Poetry Editor, Jayme Ringleb), a typewriter “instant poem” station (thank you, Cocoa Williams), and a silent auction table with donations from Barbara Hamby (baskets of her famous jams), Diane Roberts (a jar of her famous Tupelo Honey), Nonfiction Editor, Laurel Lathrop (short story consultation). and gift cards and merchandise from local businesses: Township, Madison Social, Lake Tribe Brewing Company, Fifth and Thomas, Painting with a Twist, The Bookshelf, Skate World, Sangha Press, SoDOUGH, Tally Cat Cafe, Quarter Moon Imports, Garnet and Gold, Taco Bout It, Sneaux Balls, Fat Cat Cafe, and Lucilla. Many thanks to all our donors and volunteers! Proceeds will go towards The Southeast Review printing costs.

Finally, let’s celebrate the launch of Issue 36.2! The Southeast Review has an exciting year ahead, especially as we continue to publish both emerging and established writers in both print issues and our new online companion, SER TWO (“This Week Online”), a projected initiated and executed by our wonderful Assistant Editor, Zach Linge. As Editor, I’m really looking forward to showcasing this beautiful mix of voices and continue to grow our online space. Things just keep getting better and better, so come celebrate with us at The Bark on Tuesday, September 4th. We’ll have our new issue on display (and for sale) during our event!

LEARN MORE: FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE

Summer Government Information Displays

FSU Libraries is a depository library for United States Federal publications, State of Florida publications, and United Nations Publications.

Every month I coordinate with Mohamed Berray, Social Science Librarian and Coordinator for Government Information, to create a government documents & information display around a specific topic that highlights works in our collections.

Our Government Information display area is at the far end of the Scholars Commons floor before the rear stairway and elevators.

This summer, we had three monthly displays.

  • Memorial Day Display: From May until early June we celebrated the United States’Memorial Day Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Display observance of Memorial Day. Celebrated on the last Monday in May, Memorial Day is celebrated to remember those who died while serving in the military. The display features a poster depicting members of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots (WASP). Thirty eight women in WASP have died while serving during World War II. The items on display are a mix of related federal documents, items from the general collection, and an item from our juvenile collection on Memorial Day.

 

  • National Parks Display: June and July’s display honored the National Parks including the Fourth of July celebrations on the Washington mall. Millions of people visit the national parksNational Parks Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Display every year and many go during the summer. The U.S. National Park Service commissioned Hawaii Volcano poster is a reissue of Charley Harper’s original artwork. The display included federal documents and items from the general collection. There were also some e-cards with featured e-resources viaQR codes including a link to the national parks’ celebrations for the Fourth of July.

 

  • Women’s Suffrage Display: Our current display celebrates the Women's Suffrage Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Displaywomen’s suffrage movement in honor of the Voting Rights Act’s anniversary on August 18. This poster was designed to celebrate women’s history, includes images of historic women in the letters, and has been seen on related displays. The items on display are a mix of Federal documents, UN documents, reference items, and materials from the general collection that celebrate women’s suffrage movements around the world. E-cards have QR codes for electronic resources related to the topic that you can access on or off campus.

 

Earlier this year, FSU Libraries was recognized as a top 20 depository nationwide for our outreach and display of US Federal collections. Our collections serve FSU students, faculty, and staff, and members of the Tallahassee community.

WRITTEN BY: Nicole Gaudier Alemañy

2018 FLORIDA BOOK AWARDS COMPETITION OPENS WITH CALL FOR ENTRIES

The Florida Book Awards kicks off its 12th annual competition with a call for entries in 11 categories. The Florida Book Awards competition is coordinated through the Florida State University Libraries, with the support of partner organizations from across the state. The deadline for submissions is Jan. 13, 2019
 
Established in 2006, the Florida Book Awards is the most comprehensive state book awards program in the nation.The contest recognizes and celebrates the year’s best books written by Sunshine State residents, with the exception of submissions to the Florida Nonfiction and Visual Arts categories, whose authors may live elsewhere.
 
Contest categories include: Florida Nonfiction, General Fiction, General Nonfiction, Poetry, Popular Fiction, Spanish Language, Visual Arts, Young Adult Literature, Younger Children’s Literature (ages 0-6), Older Children’s Literature (ages 7-12) and Cookbooks.
 
In 2014, the Gwen P. Reichert Gold Medal for Young Children’s Literature was introduced, providing a cash prize for the gold winner in the Younger Children’s Literature category. This award is in memory of Gwen P. Reichert and serves as a lasting tribute to honor her accomplishments as a rare book collector, her dedication to nurturing authors and their audience and her commitment to children’s education.
 
The Richard E. Rice Gold Medal Prize for Visual Arts and the Phillip and Dana Zimmerman Gold Medal Prize for Florida Nonfiction were introduced in 2016.  
 

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The Richard E. Rice Gold Medal Prize for Visual Arts supports a $500 prize for the Visual Arts Gold Medal Winner of the Florida Book Awards and serves as tribute to Richard E. Rice, who suffered from life-altering arthritis since childhood and spent a large amount of time in the hospital. From his hospital room, Rice discovered his artistic talent at the age of four and became a lifelong artist. Creating artwork offered Rice comfort, strength and joy, and this prize honors his talent and his commitment to art and to celebrate art and artists.
 
The Phillip and Dana Zimmerman Gold Medal Prize for Florida 
Nonfiction provides a $500 prize for the Gold Medal Winner of this category and serves as a tribute to the donor’s parents, Phillip and Dana Zimmerman, recognizing their deep roots in Florida and their love of Florida’s rich history and culture.
 
Applicants are encouraged to submit their books into competition any time after the competition is launched, and as soon as possible after books are officially published. Entries, which can be submitted by anyone, must be published between Jan. 1, 2018, and Dec. 31, 2018, and have an International Standard Book Number (ISBN).  All entries must be received no later than 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13, 2019 (this is not a postmark deadline).
 
Three-person juries –– including members of co-sponsoring organizations, subject experts from the faculties of Florida colleges and universities, and previous Florida Book Award winners –– will choose up to three finalists in each of 11 categories. The jury may award one Gold, Silver and Bronze medal in each category.
 
Co-sponsors of the competition include: Humanities organizations from across the state, 36827923003_8e29dcdf95_k.jpgsuch as the Florida Center for the Book, the State Library and Archives of Florida, the Florida Historical Society, the Florida Humanities Council, the Florida Literary Arts Coalition, the Florida Library Association, the Florida Association for Media in Education, the Center for Literature and Theatre @ Miami Dade College, the Florida Chapter of the Mystery Writers of America, Friends of FSU Libraries, the Florida Writers Association, the Florida Literacy Coalition and “Just Read, Florida!”
 
The 2018 winners will be announced in early March 2019 and recognized at several events around the state, including an awards banquet in April.
 
Winning books and their authors will be showcased in the summer 2019 issue of FORUM, the statewide magazine of the Florida Humanities Council, and will be featured at book festivals and association conferences throughout the year. In addition, copies of all award-winning books will be put on permanent public display in the Florida Governor’s Mansion library and in Florida State University’s Strozier Library.
 
For general information and the entry form, requirements and detailed submission instructions, visit http://floridabookawards.lib.fsu.edu.
CONTACT: Jenni McKnight, Executive Director, Florida Book Awards
(850) 644-6323; jlmcknight@fsu.edu
 
Chase Miller, Florida Book Awards Communications Director

Gathering Publicly Available Information with an API

by Keno Catabay and Rachel Smart

This is a post for anyone who is interested in utilizing web APIs to gather content or simply have questions about how to begin interacting with web APIs. Keno Catabay and myself, Rachel Smart, both work in the Office of Digital Research and Scholarship on various content gathering related projects. Keno was our Graduate Assistant since Fall 2017, pursuing data and digital pedagogy interests as well as teaching python workshops. I am the manager of the Research Repository, DigiNole, and am responsible for content recruitment, gathering, and management and all the offshoot projects.

Earlier this summer, we embarked on a project to assist FSU’s Office of Commercialization to archive approved patent documents that university affiliated researchers have filed with United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) since the 80s. These patents are to be uploaded into DigiNole, our institutional repository, increasing their discoverability, given that the USPTO Patent Full-text and Image Database(PatFT) is difficult to navigate and DigiNole is indexed by Google Scholar.

This project was accomplished, in part, using the Patent-Harvest software developed by Virginia Tech libraries. The software contains a Java script that retrieves metadata and PDF files of the patent objects from PatFT through the new API the USPTO is developing for their database, currently in its beta stage. While the Virginia Tech Patent-Harvest was an excellent starting point–thank you, VTech!–we decided that communicating directly with the USPTO API would be more beneficial for our project long-term, as we could manipulate the metadata more freely. Although, currently we rely on the VTech script to retrieve the pdf files.

If you are harvesting data from an API, you will have to familiarize yourself with the site’s unique API query language. The USPTO API query language can be found here:  API Query Language. We also had to make sure we were communicating with the correct endpoint, a URL that represents the objects we were looking to harvest. In our case, we were querying the Patents Endpoint.

Communicating with the API can be difficult for the uninitiated. For someone with a cursory understanding of IT and coding, you may run into roadblocks, specifically while attempting to communicate with the API directly from the command line/terminal of your computer. There are two main HTTP requests you can make to the server: GET requests and POST requests. GET HTTP requests appear to be the preferred standard, unless the parameters of your request exceed 2,000 characters in which case you would make a POST request.

Image of Postman's interface during a query

Snapshot of Postman’s interface during a query

Keno chose to use Postman, a free software, to send the HTTP requests without having to download packages from the command line. Depending on how much traffic is on the server, Postman is able to harvest the metadata in a few minutes for us.

Instructions for writing the parameters, or the data that we wanted from USPTO, is clearly provided by the API Query Language site, patentsview.org. In our case, we wanted our metadata to have specific fields, which are listed in the following GET request.

GET http://www.patentsview.org/api/patents/query?q={“assignee_organization”:”Florida State University Research Foundation, Inc”}&f=[“patent_number”,”patent_date”, “patent_num_cited_by_us_patents”, “app_date”, “patent_title”, “inventor_first_name”, “inventor_last_name”, “patent_abstract”, “patent_type”, “inventor_id”,”assignee_id”]&o={“per_page”:350}

Note that the request defaults to 25 results, so o={“per_page”:350} was inserted in the parameters as we expected around 200 returned results from that particular assignee.

USPTO returns the data in JSON format, which is written in an easy-to-read, key/value pair format. However, this data needs to be transformed into the xml MODS metadata format in order for the patent objects (paired metadata and pdf files) to be deposited into the research repository. A php script already being used to transform metadata for the repository was re-purposed for this transformation task, but significant changes needed to be made. When the debugging process is completed, the php script is executed through the command line with the json file as an argument, and 465 new well-formed, valid MODS records are born!

This is a screenshot of the JSON to MODS php script

Snippet of the JSON to MODS transformation script

This project took about three weeks to complete. For those curious about what kinds of inventions researchers at FSU are patenting, the collection housing these patents can be found here in the Florida State University Patent collection. The frequency at which this collection will be updated with new patents is still undecided, but currently we intend to run the script twice a year to net the recently approved patents.

GUEST BLOG: Gaining work experience in Strozier.

Margaret Bell, undergraduate student and data analyst for FSU Libraries, provided insight into her experience working in data assessment.

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Margaret Bell, Bottom Left

As a senior undergraduate student at Florida State University, I’ve become very aware of the different opportunities to be pursued on both on and off campus. This awareness, however, took me years to develop – and had I not had a job on campus, I’m sure it would have taken a lot longer. With so many people to compete with for on-campus jobs, I remember being afraid that I would graduate with zero professional experience to put on my résumé – something that seemed a little too risky especially when considering that I had no idea of what I wanted to do post graduation. Although I’m still unsure of my path at this time, I was fortunate enough to secure a position in Strozier’s assessment department by the end of my sophomore year. Members of the assessment department are responsible for collecting and analyzing data related to FSU libraries (among many other things), so as a double-major in Psychology and Editing, Writing & Media, I certainly hadn’t foreseen “Data Analyst” being my first job title.

After a period of training and adjusting to my schedule, I quickly came to see the benefits of working in Strozier. This job has been an opportunity to learn more about the resources that FSU Libraries offers students, faculty, and staff. Not just offering a physical space for learning and studying, the libraries have also compiled an invaluable online source full of useful information. Working in assessment and having to update the assessment Facts & Figures page has allowed me plenty of time to become very familiar with the Libraries’ website – something I recommend that all students do.

As this was my first time having a regular part-time job, I came in with a few worries; mostly that I would have a difficult time juggling work with classes and other extracurriculars. However, I was pleased to discover an emphasis on school coming first. This allowed me to comfortably work around my other responsibilities while also being able to supplement my FSU experience with exposure to working in a professional environment. For that reason plus the availability of many different job positions, I would absolutely advise job-seeking students to consider working for FSU Libraries.

Enrichment related to my academic and professionally-related experience aside, working in the library has added so much to my time at FSU just in terms of the wonderful people I’ve met. The assessment team – including my amazing boss Kirsten Kinsley, mentor Elizabeth Yuu (a recent graduate with a Master’s in Biostatistics who also happens to be my idol), and awesome undergraduate peers Rachael Straley and Jake Tompkins – have made the latter half of my college experience better than I ever could’ve asked for. So if there’s one thing I’d recommend to future students, it’s to not take the library for granted.

Ever wonder how many people visit Strozier and Dirac?

 

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Long lines at Starbucks, lines backed up at the turnstiles and the constant search to find the best study spots. Sound familiar? FSU Libraries are one of the most visited places on campus and for good reason! We offer numerous services to help both students and faculty succeed including everything from free tutoring, equipment checkout, 3d printing, digital research scholarship, and not to mention over 2 million items in our collections. Ever wonder exactly how many people pass through our doors each semester?

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When we examine how many student, faculty, staff, or guests have visited either Strozier or Dirac Science Libraries or both, we calculate a total of 37,499 unique visitors for the fall 2017. More of the unique visits tend to be those who visit Strozier or both Dirac and Strozier at least once during the semester.  The “both” in the following Venn diagram, means those individuals who went to both libraries at least once during fall 2017 (18,014).

 

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Strozier & Dirac – A destination for students on the main FSU campus

In the fall 2017, of the total student body of 41,900 students, 42% visited Dirac Science Library and 66% visited Strozier at least once. Of these unique visits, 17,824 were students visiting Dirac and 27,682 setting foot into Strozier. 83% of the unique visits in Dirac were students and 81% of the unique visits were students in Strozier. 37964918135_a26a826a1b_k.jpg

FSU names new dean of University Libraries

Florida State University has named Gale S. Etschmaier as dean of University Libraries, effective Sept. 7.

Etschmaier has served as the dean of library and information access at San Diego State University since 2011.

“Florida State is pleased to welcome Gale Etschmaier as our next dean of libraries,” said Sally McRorie, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs. “Our extensive library operations are critical to student and faculty success at every level and in every program. Dean Etschmaier’s proven record of innovative leadership will help keep our academic progress toward the Top 25 on track.”

Etschmaier succeeds Julia Zimmerman, who concluded her 11-year tenure as dean June 30.

As dean, Etschmaier will be responsible for the visionary leadership and overall administration of University Libraries, including oversight of nearly 140 employees and an annual operating budget of more than $18 million. The university’s collections total more than 3 million volumes, with a website offering access to nearly 900 databases, 86,500 e-journals and more than a million e-books.

“I’m excited to join the University Libraries and participate in achieving the university’s strategic goals,” Etschmaier said. “Florida State University’s libraries have attained a record of distinction, and I welcome the opportunity to work with an exceptional group of faculty and staff to build on the existing excellence and chart a course for the libraries in the digital age.”

At San Diego State, Etschmaier provided leadership for the library and the university’s student computer hub with more than 700 computers. She oversaw 80 faculty and staff, 100 student assistants and a budget of approximately $12 million.

Prior to her tenure at San Diego State, Etschmaier spent a decade as associate university librarian for public service at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. During that time, she held interim appointments as the acting associate university librarian for collection development and acting associate university librarian for library information technology. Etschmaier also served as head of George Washington’s Document Delivery Services Department from 1995-2000.

Etschmaier earned a Bachelor of Arts in music from State University of New York Stony Brook and a Master of Library Science from SUNY Albany. She received a doctoral degree in education from the University of Pennsylvania in 2010.

Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates conducted the national search, and College of Arts and Sciences Dean Sam Huckaba chaired the 13-member search committee.

BY: AMY FARNUM-PATRONIS | PUBLISHED:  |  2:31 PM |