Month: January 2016

What’s Next: Tutorials and Connected Learning

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(Photo Courtesy of San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives)

Here in the Distance Services Unit of Florida State University Libraries, we scan the environment for current trends in academic libraries and digital scholarship in order to develop pilot programs and services for the future of the library. In other words, we are always asking, “What’s Next?”. This will be an ongoing series that examines topics related to emerging trends and technologies in libraries. This week we will be discussing the idea of connected learning and how that applies to the future of academic libraries.

Connected Learning is a learning model developed by the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning Initiative which connects learners to peers all around the world through social networks, is interest-driven according to the learner’s need. Connected Learning is interactive, and the potential has been realized through the advent of interactive technologies, from cloud computing to mobile devices, to the internet of things, to digital assistantship. It is modular by nature, so it can be appropriated for a variety of users and interests. It states that learning is most effective when it engages the information-seeker with information that is relevant to their interests.

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Copyright in the Age of Digital Reproduction

* Editorial Note about Monkey Selfie – PIC BY A WILD MONKEY / DAVID SLATER / CATERS NEWS – (PICTURED: One of the photos that the monkey took with Davids camera. 1 of 2: This photo was the original photo the monkey took) – The photographer behind the famous monkey selfie picture is threatening to take legal action against Wikimedia after they refused to remove his picture because ‘the monkey took it’. David Slater, from Coleford, Gloucestershire, was taking photos of macaques on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi in 2011 when the animals began to investigate his equipment. A black crested macaque appeared to be checking out its appearance in the lens and it wasn’t long before it hijacked the camera and began snapping away. Learn more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monkey_selfie.

As a recent addition to the Office of Digital Research and Scholarship, I am relatively new to the discussions surrounding copyright that occur in libraries. My academic background is in medieval and early modern literature, so I have not had to think terribly hard about fair use; all of the works I write about are in the public domain. I once contemplated using an image from Early English Books Online in my thesis, but I took one look at the requirements for obtaining permission, cried, and continued writing my thesis without images.

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