Month: October 2019

APA Style Guide: What’s New in the 7th edition?

Fall is finally here on the main campus of FSU, and so is the 7th edition of the APA Style Publication Manual! The APA style is one of the most common styles for formatting citations and references, and more than 100 academic disciplines are reportedly using the style for their writing and publishing scholarly works. The APA 7th features two new chapters: Journal article reporting standards (Chapter 3), and bias-free language guidelines (Chapter 5), respectively. It also includes a sample paper for students, with over 100 simplified in-text citations and new reference examples.

A few notable changes in the APA 7th include:

·         One space after a period

·         No location required for book and book chapter references

·         Use of singular “they”

·         Three or more authors shortened to name of first author plus “et al.”

·         DOIs and URLs are now presented as underlined hyperlinks.


For more detail on the changes, watch the recording of webinar, “What’s New in APA Style: Inside the Seventh Edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association” from the ACRL Choice.  The APA Style Blog is the best source to get information on the APA 7th. The Blog also provides links to handouts and guides for instructors, such as Reference Quick Guide, and Student Title Page Guide.  In the meantime, contents on the 6th edition APA Style Blog are archived in here.

Six print copies of the APA 7th edition are available at the following locations of the University Libraries:

·         3 Copies at Strozier Course Reserves

·         3 Copies at Dirac Course Reserves

The copies are now available for in-library use only for 2 hours. Unfortunately, eBook copies of the APA 7th are not available for the Libraries.  The Libraries’ Citation Guide to APA will be updated accordingly, and published before Spring 2020. Stay tuned!

Kyung Kim (Social Sciences Librarian) & Kirsten Kinsley (Assessment Librarian)

Immigration: An interdisciplinary symposium

The University Libraries has a rich tradition of hosting interdisciplinary symposia. In the past, faculty members and students from across the disciplines have come together at the Libraries to explore topics such as water, open education, academic publishing, coffee, ethnography, and climate science.  On Thursday, November 7, 2019, the University Libraries will continue this tradition by hosting a symposium on the topic of immigration

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Attendees gather for a presentation at last year’s Climate Science Symposium

The event will be held in the Bradley Reading Room in Strozier Library and is sponsored by the FSU Civil Rights Institute as well as the College of Social Sciences & Public Policy. Coffee, pastries, and lunch will be provided. Everyone is welcome to attend. 

Throughout the day, different presenters will look at the topic of immigration from the perspective of their particular disciplines. The schedule has been structured to allow for numerous presentations and perspectives, as well as dialog and conversation. A primary objective of the symposium is to model critical thinking and civil discourse in a positive environment.

Terry Coonan, director of the Center for the Advancement of Human Rights, and Darby Scott, director of the FSU Immigration Law Project, will kick off the day by talking about current issues, recent policy changes, and legal battles.  They will discuss topics like diminishing protections for refugees and asylum-seekers, changes to DACA, birthright citizenship, and family separation. Suanne Sinke, Professor of History, will examine the role of family in three different groups in three different time periods of U.S. immigration. Justin Vos, also from History, will look specifically at how letters are used to encounter the first-hand perspective of immigrants, and Professor of English, Virgil Suarez, will share how his own poetry is witness and record to his family’s immigrant experience. From an anthropological perspective, Vincent Joos (Modern Languages) will discuss the brutal repression of migrants in northern France and the persistence of those migrants to rebuild their lives in the U.K. Javier Ramos, from Criminology, will then examine the link between immigration and recidivism. Ramos’ research considers the impact of legal status and nationality on the tendency to reoffend. The next two presenters, Miguel Hernandez, the co-interim director of the Center for Leadership & Social Change, and Luciana Hornung, Associate General Counsel, will both look at the impact of immigation policies on our own FSU community. Hernandez will talk about the efforts FSU has taken over the past two decades to support students that are unauthorized residents, and Hornung will discuss hot topics in employment-based immigration cases, immigrant visas, and the role of in-house counsel. Finally, Matt Hauer, a sociologist and demographer, will talk about his research on forced migration due to sea-level rise and how that migration could reshape the U.S. population distribution.  

We hope that you will be able to join us for an day of collaboration and engagement around this very important topic. A detailed schedule of the day can be found at this site: https://www.lib.fsu.edu/immigration

FSU Libraries Celebrates UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage

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The UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage marks an occasion for libraries, archives, museums, and cultural heritage institutions around the world to join together in celebrating the vital expressions of cultural identity and historical significance found in their film and audiovisual collections. As part of this annual day of recognition and advocacy, FSU Libraries will join an international cohort of institutions in showcasing its rich and unique materials with a pop-up exhibit on the Main Floor of Strozier Library on Thursday, October 24th.

Means

Running from 10am – 4pm, this interactive exhibit will feature a variety of legacy audiovisual formats and technology culled from Special Collections & Archives and Technology & Digital Scholarship. The exhibit will also include a looping video installation featuring films preserved by FSU Libraries–films chronicling important campus events like The Great Westcott Fire of 1969, moments of familial bliss and beauty as found in the Means Family Collection, and great triumphs of FSU football, Flying High Circus, and the Tarpon Club Synchronized Swimming Team. Preservation Librarian, Hannah Davis, and Resident Media Librarian, Dave Rodriguez, will be on-hand to chat with patrons and answer questions about FSU’s unique collections, preservation efforts, and the challenges and complexities inherent to the stewardship of these materials.

We hope to see you there and look forward to sharing our amazing collections with you!

Facebook Event Page

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