Author: miaweinand21

USEDiT: Universal Scientific Equipment Discovery Tool

The reproducibility of research results is one of the key tenets of scientific discovery. These results are often generated using equipment located in a scientific research laboratory. Thus, it would stand to reason that sufficient, detailed, and transparent reporting of equipment is key to allowing researchers to assess the validity of previous findings. However, the scientific community currently lacks a structured citation style or method for tracking what types of scientific lab equipment are being utilized to conduct research on grant funded projects or peer reviewed publications.  In turn, this makes it difficult for researchers to reproduce the results of other researchers and thus, contributes to the reproducibility crisis the scientific community is facing. To combat this problem, a team of librarians and scientific researchers at Florida State University and the University of California-San Diego are developing a tool that will provide a structured citation style for scientific lab equipment. The name of this tool is the Universal Scientific Equipment Discovery Tool (USEDiT).

pic2Within USEDiT, each piece of equipment is assigned a unique, persistent  universal identifier, which can then used by researchers to cite equipment in peer-reviewed publications and research grant applications. The identifiers then link out to a standardized set of information for each piece of equipment, allowing researchers to discover new relationships between equipment and research and increasing the potential for collaboration. Properly citing equipment also allows for the productivity of that equipment to be quantified, leading to a more efficient allocation of grant funding and resources.   

Current efforts are focused developing the underlying taxonomy and ontology for USEDiT, using scientific equipment from research labs at FSU as a “mini-pilot” for the project. An example of the current, working taxonomy for USEDiT is shown below.

Pic1Second, we are currently in discussions with equipment manufacturers and scientific professional societies to gauge their interest in the project and obtain feedback as we develop the tool further.

The development of USEDiT is being overseen by a multidisciplinary team of librarians and scientific researchers at Florida State University. Spearheading the effort is Dr. Claudius Mundoma, Director of the Physical Biochemistry Facility at the FSU Institute of Molecular Biophysics, and Mike Meth, Associate Dean for Research and Learning Services. Other team members from FSU Libraries include Dr. Nick Ruhs, Annie Glerum, Mark Lopez, and David Rodriguez. The team is also collaborating with Anita Bandrowski from the University of California-San Diego, who is the CEO and co-founder of SciCrunch. 

More information about USEDiT can be found on the project website:http://myweb.fsu.edu/aglerum/usedit.html. The USEDiT logo was designed by FSU Graduate, Matt Taylor, CDAorlando.com.

Any questions about the project can be directed to Dr. Nick Ruhs, STEM Research and Learning Librarian, at nruhs@fsu.edu.

Written By: Dr. Nick Ruhs

Popular Literature Collection & the President’s Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant

Begun in 2017, President’s Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Grant program approved funding for projects that helped advance FSU’s diversity goals. The Libraries received one of these grants to purchase materials for the Popular Literature Collection and grow the collection’s titles to include more diverse perspectives and experiences. These 2017-2018 additions cover a range of ethnic, racial, social, religious, gender, sexual, and personal identities and representations in addition to some related to social movements and current events. Through the funding provided by the grant, we worked to add a large addition to the collection that helps it better reflect FSU’s student, staff, and faculty’s diversity. The popular literature collection is on the first floor of Strozier library, right before the interior Starbucks and lounge area.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Book Titles & Authors

Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff–Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria  Machado–The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas–Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli–I Am Not Your Negro by James Baldwin & Raoul Peck–Wild Beauty by Anna-Marie McLemore–The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee–Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah–When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon–Meanwhile, Elsewhere: Science Fiction and Fantasy from Transgender Writers by various–Laughing All the Way to the Mosque: The Misadventures of a Muslim Woman            by Zarqa Nawaz–Bad Feminist  by Roxane Gay–The Star Side of Bird Hill by Naomi Jackson– House of Purple Cedar by Tim Tingle–Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan–We Are Okay by Nina LaCour–                  The Reason I Jump by Naoki Higashida–The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy–the Secret Loves of Geek Girls by Various–Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman–Exit West by Mohsin Hamid—Pachinko by Min Jin Lee–His Secret Son by Brenda Jackson
Savannah’s Secrets by Reese Ryan–To Tempt a Stallion by Deborah Fletcher Mello–Black by Kwanza Osajyefo & Jamal Igle–Managing Bubbie by Russel Lazega–How to Be an American Housewife by Margaret Dilloway–Geek in Korea: Discovering Asian’s New Kingdom of Cool by Daniel Tudor–The Girl Who Wrote in Silk by Kelli Estes–We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter–Mustard Seed by Laila Ibrahim–The Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin–The Obelisk Gate by N. K. Jemisin–The Stone Sky by N. K. Jemisin–The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by Issa Rae–I’m Judging You: The Do-Better Manual by Luvvie Ajayi–The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote by Elaine Weiss–
The Rock, the Road, and the Rabbi: My Journey into the Heart of Scriptural Faith and the Land Where It All Began by Kathie Lee Gifford & Jason Sobel–The Prada Plan by Ashley Antoinette–Black AF: America’s Sweetheart by Kwanza Osajyefo,‎ Jennifer Johnson &‎ Sho Murase–An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon–Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet by Ta-Nehisi Coates,‎ Chris Sprouse, Don McGregor, Rich Buckler, & Brian Stelfreeze–Black Panther: World of Wakanda by Roxane Gay, Yona Harvey, Ta-Nehisi Coates,‎Rembert Browne, Afua Richardson, Alitha martinez, Joe Bennett–Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng—Call Me by Your Name by Andre Aciman–The Upside of Unrequited            by Becky Albertalli–Bingo Loveby Tee Franklin,‎ Jenn St. Onge,‎ Joy San,‎ Genevieve FT–A Princess in Theory by Alyssa Cole—I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez–Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor–The Best of All Possible Worlds by Karen Lord–The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle–Final Girls by Riley Sager– Best Laid Plans by Brenda Jackson–Dreadnought by April Daniels–Ways of Grace: Stories of Activism, Adversity, and How Sports Can Bring Us Together by James Blake & Carol Taylor–The Blackbirds by Eric Jerome Dickey—Sovereign by April Daniels–Korea: The Impossible Country by Daniel Tudor–Tyler Johnson Was Here by Jay Coles–The Little Black Book of Success: Laws of Leadership for Black Women  by Elaine Meryl Brown,‎ Marsha Haygood & Rhonda Joy McLean– The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks–The Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon–Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal–Tash Hearts Tolstoy by Kathryn Ormsbee–Dear Martin by Nic Stone
A Girl Like Thatby Tanaz Bhathena–The Milk Lady of Bangalore by Shoba Narayan–Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

Written By: Nicole Gaudier-Alemany

Additional Study Rooms for Students

FSU Libraries is expanding the circulation of individual study room keys for students this semester! With their overall popularity throughout the last academic year (2017-18) and an-ever growing wait list, we have added more rooms to accommodate students. These study rooms are intended for individual, quiet study, available exclusively to graduate students. They are located on the second floor, and you may use the room as a temporary office space where you may leave your research materials throughout your booking time of two weeks. When you check out one of these keys, you are given a key to your assigned room, which is indicated on the key tag.

You may request one of these rooms by filling out the Graduate Student Individual Extended Time Study Room form. You will receive a confirmation email regarding the status of your reservation, but please be mindful that you may be placed on a wait list if there are no vacant rooms. Once you are approved for checking out a key, you may go to the circulation desk at any time and check it out with your FSU ID.

If you are looking for an individual study room for a shorter booking, we also have keys for 4 hour checkout. These are available at the circulation desk on a first-come, first-serve basis.  

If you have any questions or concerns about a key reservation, please contact either Jasmine Spitler (jspitler@fsu.edu) or Jeff Hipsher (jhipsher@fsu.edu).

Written By: Jasmine Spitler

Artist Books Collection Continues to Grow

For the past two years Florida State University (FSU) has been steadily growing its collection of artist’s books, which are currently housed in Special Collections & Archives. These unique works blur the boundaries between art and literature, encouraging readers to question How Books Workand what they meanto each of us. Anne Evenhaugen, the head librarian at the Smithsonian’s American Art and Portrait Gallery Library, describes artist’s books as “a medium of artistic expression that uses the form or function of ‘book’ as inspiration. It is the artistic initiative seen in the illustration, choice of materials, creation process, layout and design that makes it an art object.” The difference between a regular book and an artist’s book is determined primarily by the creator’s intentional treatment and presentation of the materials.

A few earlier posts have highlighted new and interesting artist’s books in our collection. The books we house encompass a wide range of genres, forms, and topics. We have several books that feature poetry, such as Indra’s Net by Bea Nettles. This beautifully marbled paper scroll features a poem by Grace Nettles (the artist’s mother) printed over a spider web design. Attached to the inside of the lid, a small silver bell rings to evoke the memories described in the text. The original poem, from a book called Corners, can be found in our collection as well.

Picture1

Artist’s books are often a multi-sensory experiences. Music for Teacups, a joint venture by Melissa Haviland and David Colagiovanni, is part of a larger project “investigating the destructive moment of a breaking piece of family tableware to highlight family dynamics, upbringing, inheritance, etiquette, and issues of class. ‘Music for Teacups’… rhythmically dissects the poetic moment of a falling and breaking teacup as it sounds during its last second as a complete object.” (description from Haviland’s website). The work consists of an accordian fold booklet of cut-outs shaped like teacups, as well as a 45rpm record of the accompanying music. However, since we have no playback equipment, patrons who wish to listen to the piece are directed to this sample video(from Colagiovanni’s website).

Picture2

Many of our artist’s books offer political and social commentary, or center on issues such as human rights. One such work is Bitter Chocolate by Julie Chen. The book itself is shaped like a large bar of chocolate, which unfolds like a Jacob’s ladder. Each panel is connected by magnets, so that they can be unfolded to reveal four different sides. The unique tactile and structural aspects of the piece are a staple feature of Chen’s work, but the content is equally compelling. Two of the sides narrate a story about the mythical Mayan chocolate goddess, “Cacao Woman.” The goddess rejoices the widespread love of chocolate among humans, but also laments the chocolate industry’s reliance on forced child labor, abuse, and trafficking. The other two sides feature the author’s personal memories and experiences with chocolate, as well as facts about its production worldwide.

FSU students, alumni, visitors, and the general public are invited to visit special collections and check out our rich collection of artist books. Patrons may also wish to explore how to make their own art books. Many of our works include explanations of the printing and construction processes, and we even have books designed to elicit inspiration for budding artists.  FSU also has its own publisher, the Small Craft Advisory Press. Other resources, articles, books, and artist websites are listed below.

Resources:

Articles/Books:

Artists:

Written By: Melissa Quarles

Escape the Libraries: Clue Edition

escaperoom_bannerFSU Libraries is putting on its fourth escape room program in Strozier Library during October 8-19th in study rooms 106A and 106B. The study spaces will be transformed into a Clue-themed experiential learning experience. Participants will have 20 minutes to solve a series of clues using library resources and tools to escape the room and win the game. The goal of this program is to engage students and reinforce basic research skills needed for success within their undergraduate degree.

Freshman Interest Groups (FIGs) were invited to schedule a time to bring their classes by during the program’s two week run. For those interested students not in a FIG, we will be hosting two open days where students can sign-up to participate.

Friday, October 12th from 1-5pm OR Thursday, October 18th from 5-10pm

Bring your team (2-5 people) to the “Reservation Station” at Strozier Library to sign up for a 20-minute time slot during the times listed above. The “Reservation Station” will be open starting a half hour before the first game session begins. Stop by to participate and prove your prowess as a detective.

If you have any questions or would like to book your reservation time in advance, please contact Nikki Morse at nmorse@fsu.edu.

Written by: Nikki Morse

THE FAMU-FSU COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING IS IMPROVING OUTREACH EFFORTS

FSU Libraries provides research, citation management, and public access support to students at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering. This joint program is located on a campus between Florida State University and Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida. FAMU-FSU College of Engineering offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) program in chemical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial and mechanical engineering, as well as M.S. and Ph.D. programs. Over the past 20 years, the College has awarded more than 5,000 degrees.

This year, FSU College of Engineering Librarians Renaine Julian and Denise A. Wetzel are working to increase outreach and services for students, staff, and faculty. Through the production of targeted postcards for faculty, to a brown bag workshop series, to the overhauling of the College of Engineering Library webpage, Fall 2018 is the semester of big changes.

COE_postcard_front-01

This Fall, College of Engineering Librarians are providing a series of brown bag workshops geared toward engineering researchers. These workshops will take place in Room B-202 at the College of Engineering. “Library Research 101 for Engineers” is set to be presented on Thursday, September 27thand Friday, September 28th. “Advanced Library Research for Engineers” will follow on Tuesday, October 9thand Friday, October 12th. To find out more information and to register, please click on any of the dates above. We request that all attendees bring a laptop to these sessions.

COE_workshops_social

The new FAMU-FSU College of Engineering Library webpage is now available. It can be found at: https://www.eng.famu.fsu.edu/library/. This page is simple to use, lists the library hours, includes links to get research started, and has the contact information for your College of Engineering personnel. Please take a look at this new site and bookmark it to easily find College of Engineering Library help.

If you have any questions or suggestions about FAMU-FSU College of Engineering Outreach, please contact Denise A. Wetzel at dwetzel@fsu.eduor (850) 644-3079.

Written By: Denise A. Wetzel