Author: Micah Vandegrift

Micah Vandegrift is Florida State University’s Director of Digital Scholarship. Micah heads up the Office of Digital Research and Scholarship (DRS), which provides consultations, infrastructure, and project development in the areas of: academic publishing, research data management, digital pedagogy and digital humanities. Micah also serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication and the DLF Project Managers Group Steering Committee.

Digital Scholarship Training!

Digital Scholarship is an area of growth in here in the Libraries. We’ve been flirting with the topic for a while now, and are finally getting around to launching our support infrastructure campus-wide. One decision we made early on was that we needed some hands-on training in a variety of areas. Our gracious dean, Julia Zimmerman, sent five of us to HILT (Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching), a week-long training institute with several different tracks to choose from. Below are brief report backs from each of the team members. Although most of the coursework we undertook focused on humanities-based content, the skills and aptitudes we developed will be applicable to many different types of projects.

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Introducing our Newest Librarians

Continuing the series, here are two more of our new librarians.

Renaine Julian – Data Research Librarian

Hi folks. My name is Renaine and I’m the Data Research Librarian at FSU. I’m a three time FSU alum and I couldn’t be happier to be back on campus! Before starting my current position, I worked for the Libraries for about five years as a student worker and, later, as a staff member before heading over to the state-wide library consortium, The Florida Virtual Campus.

The Data Research Librarian is a new position and I’m responsible for creating a new suite of services for students and faculty related to quantitative data as well as the management of research data. That being said, I can help you find data as well as figure out what to do with it once you have your hands on something useful. If you’re creating large datasets for your research, you’ll need a plan for managing that information and, in many cases, making it available to others. I’m working with other folks in the Libraries and around campus to develop data management consulting services to assist you in planning to keep your research intact, findable and usable.

I’m also the subject specialist for Economics, Geography, and Urban and Regional Planning. My research interests include: data management, data visualization, open data, emerging technologies and digital libraries. I work in the Scholars Commons which is located in Strozier’s basement. Please come by and say hello.

Contact Renaine – rjulian at fsu.edu

[Editors note – photo coming soon! That’s how new Stacey is!]

Hello! My name is Stacey Mantooth and I am a new addition to the library staff at Dirac Science Library. Before joining Florida State University, I earned my MSLS at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and worked at the EPA Library at Research Triangle Park in North Carolina. While I’ve lived in several states around the Southeast and Midwest, this is my first time living in Florida, and I’m excited to see what Tallahassee has to offer.

As the liaison to the Chemistry and Biochemistry and Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science departments, I help students and faculty with research activities like finding journal articles, writing literature reviews, patent searching, or managing data. I also help make decisions about what materials the Libraries buy or keep for these subjects. In addition to my regular library and liaison work, I’m interested in doing research on the information needs of STEM faculty and students on campus. Studying which information researchers need, knowing how they go about getting it, and understanding how they view the research process could lead to improved University services and greater STEM success.

Contact Stacey – smantooth at fsu.edu

Grad Student Central

Dear Grad students,

The library has just launched a homepage designed just for you! “Grad Student Central” features quick links tailored to all your research and instructional needs. You’ll find information about theses and dissertations, searching the UBorrow catalog, requesting materials via inter-library loan, targeted workshops, and more. You can also learn about the Scholars Commons department, which is devoted to providing research support for faculty and grad students. Specific tabs on the page connect you with details for teaching assistants, research support, technology, and publishing your research.

The spotlight feature on the right-hand side of the page will highlight some of the resources available through FSU Libraries. Is there an aspect of the library you would like to know more about? Suggestions are welcome to help us fill that spotlight space!

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Need to view your account? The My Account link is now located in the top right-hand corner of the page, alongside a link to OneSearch, our new tool that searches all library resources at once. (more…)

Introducing our Newest Librarians…

FSU Libraries is proud to be growing our team, especially into new positions and service areas. Look for more posts in the future introducing more folks, as we have quite a few! 

Learning Commons is our front-line librarians and staff, and is located on the first floor of Strozier Library. Serving primarily undergraduate students, Learning Commons is where you can check out a laptop, read the New York Times, meet a tutor, participate in a marathon reading of great and influential literature, or just grab a [Starbucks!] latte and hang out in the air conditioning! Emily Mann and Lindsey Wharton are both new librarians in the Learning Commons department, and introduce themselves and their roles below. (more…)

What is Digital Scholarship?

The number one question I get when talking about digital scholarship, is what exactly that means. How is digital scholarship any different than regular (analog?) scholarship? Does one have to be a technophile in order to consider what they do to qualify as digital work? These sentiments are being echoed around higher education, so its no insignificant problem for those of us who walk around talking about this as something we do. Offering clarity is the key to creating connections, so… here is my take.

Digital scholarship is project-based, collaborative, innovation-prone and embraces new modes and means of dissemination.

The reason we call this “digital” work, is because of how this type of scholarship is done – through, because of and invested in internet and technology-based tools. A key aspect of my proposed definition of Digital Scholarship is that each part needs to be represented in the whole. For example, plenty of science scholarship could be characterized as project-based, and collaborative without necessarily being interested in innovating how or where it is presented to an audience. On the flip side, traditional humanities scholarly works seem to have a lot more ground to cover to meet these criteria, which is why, I’d argue, the digital humanities garnered so much attention quickly and widely in recent years.

Beyond my speculations, here are two specific examples that I believe prove my point.  (more…)