Summer Government Information Displays

FSU Libraries is a depository library for United States Federal publications, State of Florida publications, and United Nations Publications.

Every month I coordinate with Mohamed Berray, Social Science Librarian and Coordinator for Government Information, to create a government documents & information display around a specific topic that highlights works in our collections.

Our Government Information display area is at the far end of the Scholars Commons floor before the rear stairway and elevators.

This summer, we had three monthly displays.

  • Memorial Day Display: From May until early June we celebrated the United States’Memorial Day Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Display observance of Memorial Day. Celebrated on the last Monday in May, Memorial Day is celebrated to remember those who died while serving in the military. The display features a poster depicting members of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots (WASP). Thirty eight women in WASP have died while serving during World War II. The items on display are a mix of related federal documents, items from the general collection, and an item from our juvenile collection on Memorial Day.

 

  • National Parks Display: June and July’s display honored the National Parks including the Fourth of July celebrations on the Washington mall. Millions of people visit the national parksNational Parks Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Display every year and many go during the summer. The U.S. National Park Service commissioned Hawaii Volcano poster is a reissue of Charley Harper’s original artwork. The display included federal documents and items from the general collection. There were also some e-cards with featured e-resources viaQR codes including a link to the national parks’ celebrations for the Fourth of July.

 

  • Women’s Suffrage Display: Our current display celebrates the Women's Suffrage Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Displaywomen’s suffrage movement in honor of the Voting Rights Act’s anniversary on August 18. This poster was designed to celebrate women’s history, includes images of historic women in the letters, and has been seen on related displays. The items on display are a mix of Federal documents, UN documents, reference items, and materials from the general collection that celebrate women’s suffrage movements around the world. E-cards have QR codes for electronic resources related to the topic that you can access on or off campus.

 

Earlier this year, FSU Libraries was recognized as a top 20 depository nationwide for our outreach and display of US Federal collections. Our collections serve FSU students, faculty, and staff, and members of the Tallahassee community.

WRITTEN BY: Nicole Gaudier Alemañy

2018 FLORIDA BOOK AWARDS COMPETITION OPENS WITH CALL FOR ENTRIES

The Florida Book Awards kicks off its 12th annual competition with a call for entries in 11 categories. The Florida Book Awards competition is coordinated through the Florida State University Libraries, with the support of partner organizations from across the state. The deadline for submissions is Jan. 13, 2019
 
Established in 2006, the Florida Book Awards is the most comprehensive state book awards program in the nation.The contest recognizes and celebrates the year’s best books written by Sunshine State residents, with the exception of submissions to the Florida Nonfiction and Visual Arts categories, whose authors may live elsewhere.
 
Contest categories include: Florida Nonfiction, General Fiction, General Nonfiction, Poetry, Popular Fiction, Spanish Language, Visual Arts, Young Adult Literature, Younger Children’s Literature (ages 0-6), Older Children’s Literature (ages 7-12) and Cookbooks.
 
In 2014, the Gwen P. Reichert Gold Medal for Young Children’s Literature was introduced, providing a cash prize for the gold winner in the Younger Children’s Literature category. This award is in memory of Gwen P. Reichert and serves as a lasting tribute to honor her accomplishments as a rare book collector, her dedication to nurturing authors and their audience and her commitment to children’s education.
 
The Richard E. Rice Gold Medal Prize for Visual Arts and the Phillip and Dana Zimmerman Gold Medal Prize for Florida Nonfiction were introduced in 2016.  
 

37449334226_292f56c856_k

The Richard E. Rice Gold Medal Prize for Visual Arts supports a $500 prize for the Visual Arts Gold Medal Winner of the Florida Book Awards and serves as tribute to Richard E. Rice, who suffered from life-altering arthritis since childhood and spent a large amount of time in the hospital. From his hospital room, Rice discovered his artistic talent at the age of four and became a lifelong artist. Creating artwork offered Rice comfort, strength and joy, and this prize honors his talent and his commitment to art and to celebrate art and artists.
 
The Phillip and Dana Zimmerman Gold Medal Prize for Florida 
Nonfiction provides a $500 prize for the Gold Medal Winner of this category and serves as a tribute to the donor’s parents, Phillip and Dana Zimmerman, recognizing their deep roots in Florida and their love of Florida’s rich history and culture.
 
Applicants are encouraged to submit their books into competition any time after the competition is launched, and as soon as possible after books are officially published. Entries, which can be submitted by anyone, must be published between Jan. 1, 2018, and Dec. 31, 2018, and have an International Standard Book Number (ISBN).  All entries must be received no later than 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13, 2019 (this is not a postmark deadline).
 
Three-person juries –– including members of co-sponsoring organizations, subject experts from the faculties of Florida colleges and universities, and previous Florida Book Award winners –– will choose up to three finalists in each of 11 categories. The jury may award one Gold, Silver and Bronze medal in each category.
 
Co-sponsors of the competition include: Humanities organizations from across the state, 36827923003_8e29dcdf95_k.jpgsuch as the Florida Center for the Book, the State Library and Archives of Florida, the Florida Historical Society, the Florida Humanities Council, the Florida Literary Arts Coalition, the Florida Library Association, the Florida Association for Media in Education, the Center for Literature and Theatre @ Miami Dade College, the Florida Chapter of the Mystery Writers of America, Friends of FSU Libraries, the Florida Writers Association, the Florida Literacy Coalition and “Just Read, Florida!”
 
The 2018 winners will be announced in early March 2019 and recognized at several events around the state, including an awards banquet in April.
 
Winning books and their authors will be showcased in the summer 2019 issue of FORUM, the statewide magazine of the Florida Humanities Council, and will be featured at book festivals and association conferences throughout the year. In addition, copies of all award-winning books will be put on permanent public display in the Florida Governor’s Mansion library and in Florida State University’s Strozier Library.
 
For general information and the entry form, requirements and detailed submission instructions, visit http://floridabookawards.lib.fsu.edu.
CONTACT: Jenni McKnight, Executive Director, Florida Book Awards
(850) 644-6323; jlmcknight@fsu.edu
 
Chase Miller, Florida Book Awards Communications Director

Gathering Publicly Available Information with an API

by Keno Catabay and Rachel Smart

This is a post for anyone who is interested in utilizing web APIs to gather content or simply have questions about how to begin interacting with web APIs. Keno Catabay and myself, Rachel Smart, both work in the Office of Digital Research and Scholarship on various content gathering related projects. Keno was our Graduate Assistant since Fall 2017, pursuing data and digital pedagogy interests as well as teaching python workshops. I am the manager of the Research Repository, DigiNole, and am responsible for content recruitment, gathering, and management and all the offshoot projects.

Earlier this summer, we embarked on a project to assist FSU’s Office of Commercialization to archive approved patent documents that university affiliated researchers have filed with United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) since the 80s. These patents are to be uploaded into DigiNole, our institutional repository, increasing their discoverability, given that the USPTO Patent Full-text and Image Database(PatFT) is difficult to navigate and DigiNole is indexed by Google Scholar.

This project was accomplished, in part, using the Patent-Harvest software developed by Virginia Tech libraries. The software contains a Java script that retrieves metadata and PDF files of the patent objects from PatFT through the new API the USPTO is developing for their database, currently in its beta stage. While the Virginia Tech Patent-Harvest was an excellent starting point–thank you, VTech!–we decided that communicating directly with the USPTO API would be more beneficial for our project long-term, as we could manipulate the metadata more freely. Although, currently we rely on the VTech script to retrieve the pdf files.

If you are harvesting data from an API, you will have to familiarize yourself with the site’s unique API query language. The USPTO API query language can be found here:  API Query Language. We also had to make sure we were communicating with the correct endpoint, a URL that represents the objects we were looking to harvest. In our case, we were querying the Patents Endpoint.

Communicating with the API can be difficult for the uninitiated. For someone with a cursory understanding of IT and coding, you may run into roadblocks, specifically while attempting to communicate with the API directly from the command line/terminal of your computer. There are two main HTTP requests you can make to the server: GET requests and POST requests. GET HTTP requests appear to be the preferred standard, unless the parameters of your request exceed 2,000 characters in which case you would make a POST request.

Image of Postman's interface during a query

Snapshot of Postman’s interface during a query

Keno chose to use Postman, a free software, to send the HTTP requests without having to download packages from the command line. Depending on how much traffic is on the server, Postman is able to harvest the metadata in a few minutes for us.

Instructions for writing the parameters, or the data that we wanted from USPTO, is clearly provided by the API Query Language site, patentsview.org. In our case, we wanted our metadata to have specific fields, which are listed in the following GET request.

GET http://www.patentsview.org/api/patents/query?q={“assignee_organization”:”Florida State University Research Foundation, Inc”}&f=[“patent_number”,”patent_date”, “patent_num_cited_by_us_patents”, “app_date”, “patent_title”, “inventor_first_name”, “inventor_last_name”, “patent_abstract”, “patent_type”, “inventor_id”,”assignee_id”]&o={“per_page”:350}

Note that the request defaults to 25 results, so o={“per_page”:350} was inserted in the parameters as we expected around 200 returned results from that particular assignee.

USPTO returns the data in JSON format, which is written in an easy-to-read, key/value pair format. However, this data needs to be transformed into the xml MODS metadata format in order for the patent objects (paired metadata and pdf files) to be deposited into the research repository. A php script already being used to transform metadata for the repository was re-purposed for this transformation task, but significant changes needed to be made. When the debugging process is completed, the php script is executed through the command line with the json file as an argument, and 465 new well-formed, valid MODS records are born!

This is a screenshot of the JSON to MODS php script

Snippet of the JSON to MODS transformation script

This project took about three weeks to complete. For those curious about what kinds of inventions researchers at FSU are patenting, the collection housing these patents can be found here in the Florida State University Patent collection. The frequency at which this collection will be updated with new patents is still undecided, but currently we intend to run the script twice a year to net the recently approved patents.

GUEST BLOG: Gaining work experience in Strozier.

Margaret Bell, undergraduate student and data analyst for FSU Libraries, provided insight into her experience working in data assessment.

Screen Shot 2018-07-27 at 2.22.10 PM.png

Margaret Bell, Bottom Left

As a senior undergraduate student at Florida State University, I’ve become very aware of the different opportunities to be pursued on both on and off campus. This awareness, however, took me years to develop – and had I not had a job on campus, I’m sure it would have taken a lot longer. With so many people to compete with for on-campus jobs, I remember being afraid that I would graduate with zero professional experience to put on my résumé – something that seemed a little too risky especially when considering that I had no idea of what I wanted to do post graduation. Although I’m still unsure of my path at this time, I was fortunate enough to secure a position in Strozier’s assessment department by the end of my sophomore year. Members of the assessment department are responsible for collecting and analyzing data related to FSU libraries (among many other things), so as a double-major in Psychology and Editing, Writing & Media, I certainly hadn’t foreseen “Data Analyst” being my first job title.

After a period of training and adjusting to my schedule, I quickly came to see the benefits of working in Strozier. This job has been an opportunity to learn more about the resources that FSU Libraries offers students, faculty, and staff. Not just offering a physical space for learning and studying, the libraries have also compiled an invaluable online source full of useful information. Working in assessment and having to update the assessment Facts & Figures page has allowed me plenty of time to become very familiar with the Libraries’ website – something I recommend that all students do.

As this was my first time having a regular part-time job, I came in with a few worries; mostly that I would have a difficult time juggling work with classes and other extracurriculars. However, I was pleased to discover an emphasis on school coming first. This allowed me to comfortably work around my other responsibilities while also being able to supplement my FSU experience with exposure to working in a professional environment. For that reason plus the availability of many different job positions, I would absolutely advise job-seeking students to consider working for FSU Libraries.

Enrichment related to my academic and professionally-related experience aside, working in the library has added so much to my time at FSU just in terms of the wonderful people I’ve met. The assessment team – including my amazing boss Kirsten Kinsley, mentor Elizabeth Yuu (a recent graduate with a Master’s in Biostatistics who also happens to be my idol), and awesome undergraduate peers Rachael Straley and Jake Tompkins – have made the latter half of my college experience better than I ever could’ve asked for. So if there’s one thing I’d recommend to future students, it’s to not take the library for granted.

Ever wonder how many people visit Strozier and Dirac?

 

37627868222_f92fb68e74_k.jpg

Long lines at Starbucks, lines backed up at the turnstiles and the constant search to find the best study spots. Sound familiar? FSU Libraries are one of the most visited places on campus and for good reason! We offer numerous services to help both students and faculty succeed including everything from free tutoring, equipment checkout, 3d printing, digital research scholarship, and not to mention over 2 million items in our collections. Ever wonder exactly how many people pass through our doors each semester?

24143649227_00e5ad5f74_k.jpg

When we examine how many student, faculty, staff, or guests have visited either Strozier or Dirac Science Libraries or both, we calculate a total of 37,499 unique visitors for the fall 2017. More of the unique visits tend to be those who visit Strozier or both Dirac and Strozier at least once during the semester.  The “both” in the following Venn diagram, means those individuals who went to both libraries at least once during fall 2017 (18,014).

 

strozdirac.jpg

 

Strozier & Dirac – A destination for students on the main FSU campus

In the fall 2017, of the total student body of 41,900 students, 42% visited Dirac Science Library and 66% visited Strozier at least once. Of these unique visits, 17,824 were students visiting Dirac and 27,682 setting foot into Strozier. 83% of the unique visits in Dirac were students and 81% of the unique visits were students in Strozier. 37964918135_a26a826a1b_k.jpg

FSU names new dean of University Libraries

Florida State University has named Gale S. Etschmaier as dean of University Libraries, effective Sept. 7.

Etschmaier has served as the dean of library and information access at San Diego State University since 2011.

“Florida State is pleased to welcome Gale Etschmaier as our next dean of libraries,” said Sally McRorie, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs. “Our extensive library operations are critical to student and faculty success at every level and in every program. Dean Etschmaier’s proven record of innovative leadership will help keep our academic progress toward the Top 25 on track.”

Etschmaier succeeds Julia Zimmerman, who concluded her 11-year tenure as dean June 30.

As dean, Etschmaier will be responsible for the visionary leadership and overall administration of University Libraries, including oversight of nearly 140 employees and an annual operating budget of more than $18 million. The university’s collections total more than 3 million volumes, with a website offering access to nearly 900 databases, 86,500 e-journals and more than a million e-books.

“I’m excited to join the University Libraries and participate in achieving the university’s strategic goals,” Etschmaier said. “Florida State University’s libraries have attained a record of distinction, and I welcome the opportunity to work with an exceptional group of faculty and staff to build on the existing excellence and chart a course for the libraries in the digital age.”

At San Diego State, Etschmaier provided leadership for the library and the university’s student computer hub with more than 700 computers. She oversaw 80 faculty and staff, 100 student assistants and a budget of approximately $12 million.

Prior to her tenure at San Diego State, Etschmaier spent a decade as associate university librarian for public service at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. During that time, she held interim appointments as the acting associate university librarian for collection development and acting associate university librarian for library information technology. Etschmaier also served as head of George Washington’s Document Delivery Services Department from 1995-2000.

Etschmaier earned a Bachelor of Arts in music from State University of New York Stony Brook and a Master of Library Science from SUNY Albany. She received a doctoral degree in education from the University of Pennsylvania in 2010.

Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates conducted the national search, and College of Arts and Sciences Dean Sam Huckaba chaired the 13-member search committee.

BY: AMY FARNUM-PATRONIS | PUBLISHED:  |  2:31 PM | 

FSU Libraries welcomes first cohort of Diversity Resident Librarian Program

Florida State University Libraries welcomes its first cohort of the university’s new Diversity Resident Librarian Program, which aims to increase the number of qualified academic librarians from members of traditionally underrepresented groups.

In alignment with Florida State’s strategic plan, the goals of the program are attaining more diversity of thought in program development and libraries practices and increasing agility in serving diverse student and faculty populations.

“We were looking for early career librarians who could offer us unique perspectives while we provide them with opportunities and assignments that will help them hone their skills in academic librarianship,” said Susannah Miller, interim dean of FSU Libraries and associate dean of administration.

During their three-year appointments, the four resident librarians will have the opportunity to develop competencies and skills in the areas of higher education librarianship. The program will concentrate on providing services to students and faculty, libraries operations including acquisition and collection management, special collections, and areas of strategic focus such as technology and digital scholarship.

“We hope that this program will open up opportunities for residents to begin long-term careers as academic librarians,” said Bridgett Birmingham, FSU’s diversity and inclusion librarian. “We are doing our part here at FSU Libraries to make sure that our academic libraries better reflect the diverse communities that we serve.”

The cohort also will engage in libraries practices, including faculty assembly activities, professional development, work teams and management meetings.

Each resident will be placed in a functional area where they will further hone their skills. Experienced librarians will provide mentorship and guidance to the residents specific to their needs and skill levels, and the residents will work with members of senior management on career-focused individual development plans.

Meet the residents:

 

Theresa Arias

Arias completed her Master of Library and Information Science degree at the University of Washington, and she will complete a Master of Arts in History with an Archival Administration Certificate from the University of Texas at Arlington this summer. Arias’ professional and research interests include information literacy, especially in underserved populations, and diversity and inclusion in collection development in archives and academic libraries.

 

 

Michael Mohkamkar

Mohkamkar is a graduate of the University of North Texas with a Master of Science inLibrary Science and Master of Arts in Linguistics. Before coming to FSU, he worked at the Dallas Public Libraries. His research interests include library usage by international and other minority student groups and working to promote accessibility of academic library materials.

 

 

 

Mallary Rawls

Rawls comes from the LeRoy Collins Main Library in Tallahassee, where she served as a Youth Services Information Professional for two years. She completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in interdisciplinary humanities and earned her Master of Library & Information Science, both from FSU. Her research interest includes information literacy, open access resources and increasing diversity and inclusion in academic libraries and research.

 

 

 

Dave Rodriguez

Before coming to FSU Libraries, Rodriguez spent nearly a decade working in film and audiovisual media preservation and exhibition. After graduating from New College of Florida (‘09), he earned an MA in film and media studies from the University of Florida (‘11), where he first began working with media collections. Rodriguez went on to attend The L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation at George Eastman Museum, where he later served as an instructor and chief projectionist of the Motion Picture Department. He managed the archive at The Center for Moving Image Arts at Bard College before returning to his hometown of Miami in 2015. There, Rodriguez worked as an archival film projectionist in arthouse cinemas, as a technician at Continental Film & Digital Laboratory and in Special Collections at University of Miami Libraries. His research interests include digital stewardship, media archaeology, media art preservation and developing open educational resources and outreach in these areas.

To learn more about the Diversity Resident Librarian Program, contact Bridgett Birmingham at bbirmingham@fsu.edu.

Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development

mango-may-2018-celebrate-diversityOn November 2, 2001, the General Conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) adopted the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity in Paris, France. This Declaration defines “Cultural Diversity” or “Multiculturalism” as the harmonious co-existence and interaction of different cultures, where “culture should be regarded as the set of distinctive spiritual, material, intellectual and emotional features of society or a social group, and that it encompasses, in addition to art and literature; lifestyles, ways of living together, value systems, traditions and beliefs”. This Declaration lead to the United Nations first ever celebration of the United Nations Year for Cultural Heritage. In December 2002, the 57th Session of the United Nations General Assembly adopted Resolution 57/249 that declared May 21 each year as the World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development. This day is intended to give an opportunity to help communities understand the value of cultural diversity and learn how to live together. It’s an occasion to promote world culture and highlight the significance of diversity as an agent of inclusion and positive change. It celebrates not only the richness of the world’s cultures, but the essential role of intercultural dialogue for achieving peace and sustainable development.

This is important to libraries for many reasons. Libraries serve diverse interests and communities. We function as learning, cultural, and information centers driven by our commitment to the principles of fundamental freedoms and equity of access to information and knowledge for all. This point was also buttressed in UNESCO’s first ever Cultural Diversity Publication Series, launched at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg in 2002, in which UNESCO states that libraries and cultural centers, as part of their new missions, must “strive to promote the actors and expressions of cultural diversity in such a way as to ensure that as many people as possible are exposed – and enjoy access – to the wealth of that diversity”.

These values were further expanded on in the IFLA/UNESCO Multicultural Library Manifesto that stipulates that each individual has the right to a full range of library and information services, and that libraries should adhere to 4 main principles of cultural diversity:

  1. Serve all members of the community without discrimination based on cultural and linguistic heritage;
  2. Provide information in appropriate languages and scripts;
  3. Give access to a broad range of materials and services reflecting all communities and needs;
  4. Employ staff to reflect the diversity of the community, who are trained to work with and serve diverse communities.

This Manifesto supports ALA’s interpretations of “Diversity Standards: Cultural Competency for Academic Libraries” (2012), which advocates to “support diversity skills training and diversity education—including the exploration of social justice, privilege and oppression, and fear and anger around cultural diversity issues—in a safe environment that allows for discussion and reflection”. Libraries are in the unique position to celebrate culture’s manifold forms, from the tangible and intangible, to the diversity of cultural expressions, and reflect on how these contribute to dialogue, mutual understanding, and the social, environmental and economic vectors of sustainable development. The core activities of library and information services for culturally and linguistically diverse communities are central, not “separate” or “additional”, and should always be designed to meet local or specific needs.

In 2013, The United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) in partnership with UNESCO and a wide coalition of partners from corporations to civil society launched the world campaign “Do One Thing for Diversity and Inclusion”, aimed at engaging people around the world to Do One Thing to support Cultural Diversity and Inclusion. This campaign:

  • Raises awareness worldwide about the importance of intercultural dialogue, diversity and inclusion;
  • Build a world community of individuals committed to supporting diversity with real and everyday-life gestures;
  • Combat polarization and stereotypes to improve understanding and cooperation among people from different cultures.

Do one thing today to support cultural diversity. Read a book by an author from a different culture, reach out to a diverse staff and let them know how much you appreciate their presence at work, be creative, and as always, feel free to reach out to the FSU Libraries Diversity and Inclusion Committee with your ideas.  

Written by Mohamed Berray, Social Sciences Librarian | Coordinator for Government Information, Florida State University Libraries

Resources

  1. United Nations World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development: http://www.un.org/en/events/culturaldiversityday/
  2. UNESCO World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development: https://en.unesco.org/commemorations/culturaldiversityday
  3. IFLA/UNESCO Multicultural Library Manifesto: “The Multicultural Library – a gateway to a cultural diverse society in dialogue: https://www.ifla.org/node/8976
  4. UNESCO Cultural Diversity Series No. 1. Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity: A Vision, A Conceptual Platform, A Pool of Ideas for Implementation, A New Paradigm. A Document for the World Summit on Sustainable Development, Johannesburg, 26 August – 4 September, 2002. http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0012/001271/127162e.pdf.
  5. Diversity Standards: Cultural Competency for Academic Libraries (2012): http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/diversity

Curriculum Mapping: An Overview

Guest blog by FSU Student, Carolyn Dang.

Curriculum mapping is a method of analyzing an academic program to find important motifs between courses (Buchanan et al., 2015). Based on the analysis, a support system can be created to help students achieve the learning objectives. Curriculum mapping seeks to answer three main questions:

  • What is taught?
  • How is it taught?
  • When is it taught?

By collaborating with faculty members and identifying core skills, the perception of the library can also change. The library is traditionally seen as giving scholarly products. However by using curriculum mapping, students can begin using the library for scholarly processes (Booth and Mathews, 2012).

Curriculum mapping + Student = ?

For most courses, I print out the two most important pages of the syllabus; the first and the last. Why? As a student, I care about the grading scale, textbook requirement, and the list of due dates. I think those are the three main pillars a student needs to be successful in a class, but what are supporting those pillars? How do we connect those pillars to create a better foundation for students?

The daily schedule for a student may include (1) attending lecture, (2) finding the assignment/exam that is due, (3) crying in the library trying to figure out what they don’t know, (4) going home, (5) rinse and repeat.

FSU libraries provides resources to students such as late night tutoring, software tutorials (through Lynda.com), and research assistance. Having worked at the Learning Common’s circulation desk for the past two and a half years, I have noticed that some students are more reactive rather than proactive. Students tend to run into major problems closer to the deadline. For instance, not understanding how to use a program or cramming five textbook chapters before the night of an exam.

I think that curriculum mapping will have positive effects on students academically and professionally. By providing resources that are catered to student’s classes, students have the opportunity to be more prepared for deadlines. This may help alleviate a burden on technology and tutoring staff with an influx of students the night before. By curriculum mapping courses, library staff have more time to prepare resources based on the course schedules and provide higher quality services to students. As mentioned by Moser et al. (2011), curriculum mapping is a method to help students connect the dots between the skills they have learned. A tight collaboration between librarians and faculty will help staff identify gaps within the student’s learning. Therefore, the library can provide supplemental resources and events to help students.

One of the resources created can be workshops. Although the main reason for workshops would be to teach students different resources, it can be an additional networking opportunity. By clustering students from the same departments in a workshop, this gives students a chance to create connections with their peers.

As a student, I think that curriculum mapping has the potential to create positive outcomes. It would construct a more collaborative, in-sync learning and teaching environment for students, faculty, and library staff. It will be interesting to see how curriculum mapping will work with a diverse set of courses and number of departments.

Sources: 

Booth, C., & Mathews, B. (2012, April 7). Understanding the Learner Experience: Threshold Concepts … Retrieved from http://www.carl-acrl.org/conference2012/2012CARLproceedings/Understanding%20the%20Learner%20Experience_BoothMathews2012.pdf

Buchanan, H., Webb, K. K., Houk, A. H., & Tingelstad, C. (2015). Curriculum Mapping in Academic Libraries. New Review Of Academic Librarianship21(1), 94-111. doi:10.1080/13614533.2014.1001413

Moser, M., Heisel, A., Jacob, N., & McNeill, K. (2011, April 2). A More Perfect Union: Campus Collaborations for Curriculum Mapping Information Literacy Outcomes. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/conferences/confsandpreconfs/national/2011/papers/more_perfect_union.pdf

The Pride Student Union Records, 1964-2015

By: Hannah Wiatt Davis

We are excited to announce our most recently processed collection, the Pride Student Union Records, 1964-2015. Now a major fixture in the Student Government Association, the collection documents Pride’s predecessor organizations and their steps towards becoming an official agency, introducing non-discrimination policies on campus, and empowering FSU’s LGBTQ+ population.

In 1969, gay and lesbians in Tallahassee organized the People’s Coalition for Gay Rights, which later became the Alliance for Gay Awareness, as a response to the Stonewall Riots. The group was primarily a political organization active in the gay rights movement of the 1970s. In 1973, staff of the University Mental Health Center (now the Student Counseling Center) formed Gay Peer Counseling to provide support and counseling for gays and lesbian students. It became the most active LGBTQ+ group on campus in the early 1970s. In 1978, the group evolved into the Gay Peer Volunteers (GPV), which provided students opportunities for services in the community outside of the counseling environment. To include all students directly served by this student organization, the Gay Peer Volunteers changed its name to the Gay/Lesbian Student Union (GLSU) in 1989, Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual Student Union (LGBSU) in 1994, Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender Student Union (LGBTSU) in 1998, and finally Pride Student Union in 2005.

dragwarsThere are several other auxiliary groups at FSU that have served the LGBTQ+ population. In 1984, Gay/Lesbian Support Services formed to continue and expand upon the goals and services of the preceding organizations.  In the 1990s, a specialist in student counseling continued the mission of GPV by founding Gay and Lesbian Allies (GALA), which was later absorbed by Tallahassee LGBTQ+ community center, Family Tree. Safe Zone-Tallahassee was founded in 1997 as a response to FSU administration to fund an LGBTQ+ committee or office space. In 2012, Safe Zone was revamped into Seminole Allies & Safe Zones, and provides workshops to students, faculty, and staff.

The collection contains administrative records, promotional materials, artwork and banners, newspapers, and journal and magazine clippings produced and collected by the organization since the late 1960s. Spanning from meeting minutes to posters for drag shows, protest banners and queer literature, the Pride Student Union Records provide a varied look at the voices of the LGBTQ+ community in Tallahassee.

To see more photographs, ephemera, and artifacts related to the history of Florida State, check out the FSU Heritage Protocol Digital Collections or like the Heritage Protocol Facebook page.